High School Course Descriptions

Language Arts Courses – 4 years required

-English I Pre-AP: Grammar/Composition/Literature
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook:The Language of Literature I (McDougal Littell)
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: 9

This course is an in-depth study of writing, grammar, and the analysis of literature, with a focus on developing effective rhetorical writing strategies. Students gain familiarity with research techniques through writing documented essays which include proper MLA formatted citations and a works-cited page, and increase their writing skills through expository analysis. In literature, the elements of fiction are emphasized and in-depth reading strategies are applied to the study of stories, plays, poetry, and novels.  Novels included are Night, 1984, and The Outsiders. More novels may be added or the list changed as needed based on student’s previous novels read.

-English II Pre-AP: Grammar/Composition/Literature
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2) 
Textbook:The Language of Literature II (McDougal Littell)
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: 10

This course is designed to promote the writing of mature expository analysis and rhetorical essays, including effective grammar, usage, and mechanics in all writing assignments. Students gain familiarity with research techniques through writing documented essays which include proper MLA formatted citations and a works-cited page. Different literary genres are studied thematically as seen in the basic conflicts of man. Special emphasis is placed on the nonfiction essay as a means to analyze an author’s style of writing and its effect on the theme/characters/plot. This course is designed to strengthen the skills necessary for success in the 11th and/or 12th grade AP English courses. 

-English III: American Literature/Language & Composition (Regular)
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook:The Language of American Literature (McDougal Littell)
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: 11

American literature classes examine literary thought and style through the twentieth century as it reflects the religious, political, and social conditions. Students will study ways to express ideas through logical organization, sufficient development, unity, coherence, rhetorical and literary devices, and correct grammar and usage. Higher order thinking skills necessary for effective verbal and written communication will be stressed. Students will expand their familiarity with research techniques by developing a documented research project, utilizing technology and other sources. Through this study students will learn to value, appreciate, and understand the function and power of language.

 A study of rhetoric, Language and Composition explores the structure of logic and argument. Students read and write argumentative / persuasive papers including a documented argumentative essay. Through critical reading, students analyze a writer’s devices and use of language in order to interpret purpose, attitude, and effect. Students will expand their familiarity with research techniques by developing a documented research project, utilizing the media center and other sources.

-English IV: British Literature/Language & Composition (Regular and AP)
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: The Language of British Literature(McDougal Littell)
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: 12  

British literature classes examine literary thought and style through the twentieth century as it reflects the religious, political, and social conditions. Students will study ways to express ideas through logical organization, sufficient development, unity, coherence, rhetorical and literary devices, and correct grammar and usage. Higher order thinking skills necessary for effective verbal and written communication will be stressed. Students will expand their familiarity with research techniques by developing a documented research project, technology, and other sources. Through this study students will learn to value, appreciate, and understand the function and power of language.

This course also stresses the analytical/critical study of four genres: narrative fiction, verse, drama, and the essay. The composition portion stresses a mastery of the skills for application through evaluation, primarily ordering ideas into logical patterns and developing these ideas with pertinent and valid detail. Students write analytical and documented essays. Students will expand their familiarity with research techniques by developing a documented research project, utilizing the media center and other sources.

-English Composition I – ENG 102  (Dual Credit)*
(1 Semester – Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: Graff, Gerald and Cathy Graff.  They Say I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. New York: Norton. 3rd Edition. ISBN: 978-0393935844
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor
Grade level: 11 and 12

This course focuses on helping students develop effective processes for writing in multiple genres, including research-based academic projects and creative works. Students will learn techniques for generating ideas; giving and receiving feedback; finding, evaluating and integrating sources; adapting rhetorical strategies for audience and context; revising; and editing.A student who successfully completes the course should have certain experiences and attitudes as well as an understanding of particular writing and rhetorical concepts and be well prepared to successfully complete English Comp II – ENG 201.  

-English Composition II – ENG 201 (Dual Credit)*
(1 Semester – Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: Mays, Kelly J. The Norton Introduction to Literature 12th Edition.  New York: W.W Norton and Company, 2017.
Prerequisite:Approval of Instructor
Grade level: 11-12 – Dual credit *

A general background in the reading, interpretation, evaluation, and criticism of literature in various genres.  Reading. An introduction to literature course requires substantial amounts of reading. The reading schedule is provided as the course guide. Students must keep up with the assignments in order to participate in class discussions. Failure to read will affect grades on exams, and papers. Three papers are written over the course of the semester – two close reading papers and the final paper. While details will be provided for each assignment, these papers will all demonstrate the student’s ability to attend closely to language, the use of diction, form, and structure-while at the same time demonstrating the student’s active reading abilities. There will be tests over short fiction, poetry, a midterm, and a final exam in this course. These exams will test the objective content from the texts, particularly through identification of the passages highlighted in class lectures and discussions. Each student will do two presentations.

-Literature for Life
(1 Semester – Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: Multiple texts.
Prerequisite: Completion of English Composition I and English Composition II
Grade level: 12

This course focuses on contemporary literature and its application to adult life. A variety of compilation textbooks and novels are used throughout the course with much chosen to study is student driven. The primary focus is the application of lessons learned and themes explored to adult life as these seniors complete their final year of high school. Writing focuses on literary elements and thematic schemes of the human condition. 

-Creative Writing
(1 Semester- Elective Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: Creative Writing 101 by Stuart Albright  McKinnon Press 2016
Prerequisite:  Recommendation of current English teacher; class offered depending on enrollment
Grade Level: 11, 12

One semester course that covers writing fiction, non fiction, poetry, short stories, novels, and song lyrics. Writing prompts and scenarios are provided daily. Students learn to use their imaginations to express life’s joy and sorrow, trials and tribulations, fun and excitement. Students are not confined by the conventions of academic writing and nonstandard usage is allowed. Students must be able and willing to share and present to the class some of their writings throughout the course. There is also an emphasis on peer review and some team writings. Students have a mandatory assignment of keeping a journal about their walk with God throughout the semester. It is the final exam. 

Dual credit means that in addition to the high school required English credit, the student is also earning their English credits for college. 

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Mathematics Courses – 4 years of Math required, including Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry

Algebra I credit may be earned in 8th grade.  It is strongly recommended that anyone making below 80% in 8th grade Algebra I repeat Algebra I in 9th grade.  High school credits earned in 8th grade count toward graduation requirements, but do not count on high school grade point.

-Algebra I
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Algebra 1 – Oklahoma edition (McGraw Hill)
Calculator: TI 30xII Multiview
Prerequisite: None
Grade Level: 8, 9,10

This foundational course is a study of the language of algebra in which the student learns to interpret and solve problems using algebraic terms and concepts. Concepts taught include operations with rational numbers, solving and graphing equations/inequalities, functions, polynomials, factoring, solving and graphing systems of equations/inequalities, radical and rational expressions, quadratic equations, and statistics. 

-Geometry
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Calculator: TI 30xII Multiview
Textbook: Geometry (McGraw Hill)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Algebra I
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course includes a study of the basic elements of Geometry and construction, reasoning and proofs, parallel lines and transversals, coordinate geometry including slope and equations of lines, polygonal properties with an emphasis on triangles and quadrilaterals, triangle congruence, relationships in triangles, proportions and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, transformations, circles, area, surface area, and volume.

-Algebra II
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Calculator: TI 83/84
Textbook: Algebra 2 (Glencoe)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course begins with a review of concepts learned in Algebra I. Students then develop a more in depth knowledge of systems of equations / inequalities, quadratic functions and inequalities, polynomial functions and probability/statistics. New concepts studied include matrices, conic sections, rational equations, exponential and logarithmic relations, sequences, and series.

-Pre-Calculus
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Advanced Mathematical Concepts (Glencoe)
Calculator: TI 83/84
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II credit. (Recommended grade 80% or above)
Grade level: 11 & 12 

The first semester gives a review study of straight lines, conic sections, simplification of equations, algebraic curves, transcendental curves, a completed study of straight lines, simplification of equations, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and an introduction to limits and derivatives The second semester includes a study of six basic functions of trigonometry, solutions of right and oblique triangles, identities, and complex numbers. The calculator is used as an aide to computations. This course is designed to be a preparation course for Calculus.

-Calculus I (Dual Credit)
(2 semesters – Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: TBD
Calculator: TI 83/84
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (Recommended grade 80% or above); teacher recommendation
Grade Level: 12

A beginning course in the analysis of functions including analytic geometry. A study of limits, techniques and applications of differentiation, basic integration and transcendental functions. Prerequisite: 4 years of high school mathematics or equivalent.

-Introduction to Statistics (Dual Credit)
(2 semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: TBD
Calculator: TI 83/84
Prerequisite:  Algebra II (Recommended grade 80% or above); teacher recommendation
Grade Level: 12

The fundamentals of elementary statistics, data collection and analysis, probability, distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. 

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Science Courses – 4 years of lab science required, including Biology I

Biblical Integration: God is the creator of all things. (Genesis 1:1) The Biblical integration of science in these classes reveals the intelligence and vastness of God. The hearts and minds of the students should be filled with a sense of awe and wonder at the incredible design and works of our most amazing creator. However, we will also learn that man must look beyond science (to God and His Word) in order to understand the real meaning of life. (1 Corinthians 2:14-15)  The curriculum and assessments have been aligned to the Oklahoma Academic Standards for Science (OASS), CCSS, and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).  

-Biology I
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Pearson Biology for Oklahoma (2016 Edition – Miller & Levine)
Prerequisite: None
Grade Level: 9,10

This is a laboratory science course where students will explore the inner workings of the cell and the basic life processes such as cell division, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration.. They will also examine the similarities and differences of the various classifications of organisms.  Other topics include ecosystems (interactions, energy, dynamics, biodiversity) and heredity (inheritance and variation of traits).  Student labs may include the dissection of representative species of various groups. Students will have at least one project in the fall semester and at least one project in the spring semester.

-Environmental Science
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Pearson Environmental Science Your Turn Your World (2011 Edition – Withgott)
Prerequisite: Biology I
Grade Level:  10, 11, 12  

Environmental Science is the study of how the natural world works, how our environment affects us, and how we affect our environment.  Emphasis is placed on human stewardship of Creation. Students conduct lab activities relevant to the topic being discussed in class – Earth’s resources, Humans and the Environment, Policies, and Sustainable Practices.  Students will have at least one project in the fall semester and at least one project in the spring semester. This course may not be offered every year.

-Anatomy and Physiology
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Pearson Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology (11th Edition – Marieb)
Prerequisite: Biology I
Recommended: Minimum of “C” in previous science course
Grade Level:  10, 11, 12  

Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the human body structure as it relates to function.  Emphasis is placed on body systems and their relationship to each other.  Students will conduct experiments relevant to the topic being discussed in class.  Student labs may include the dissection of representative species of various groups.  Students will have at least one project in the fall and one project in the spring.  This course may not be taught every year.   

-Chemistry I
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Pearson Chemistry (2012 Wilbraham, Staley, Matta, Waterman)
Prerequisite: Current enrollment in or completion of Algebra II / Biology I
Recommended: Minimum of “C” in previous science course
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

This course investigates the physical and chemical properties of matter and the changes it undergoes. Topics covered include: atomic structure, periodicity of the elements, nomenclature of ionic & covalent compounds, stoichiometry and the mole concept, types of chemical reactions, behavior of gases, and reactions and properties of acids & bases. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and modeling of physical and chemical changes on symbolic, submicroscopic and macroscopic scales.  Students will conduct experiments relevant to the topic being discussed in class.  Students will have at least one project in the fall semester and at least one project in the spring semester. This course may not be taught every year.  

-Principles of Biology BIO 110 (College Concurrent  – Concordia)
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 4)
Textbook: Pearson AP Edition Campbell Biology (11th Edition)
Prerequisite: Biology I/Chemistry I/Algebra II
Recommended: Minimum of “C” in previous science course
Grade Level: 11, 12

A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing – Scientific methodology and practice, literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells, cell organelles, molecular biology, genetics, systematics, structure and function of plants and animals, reproduction, growth and development, population biology, evolution as a paradigm and ecology.  This course is a survey of the major concepts in biology. This course is required for students working towards a Natural Sciences endorsement in middle grade education. This course is also required for students working towards a Physics endorsement or Chemistry endorsement in secondary education. It can also be used to fulfill general education requirements in science.

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Social Studies Courses – 4 years required, including Government, Oklahoma History, U.S History, World History, and Economics 

-Oklahoma History
(1 Semester Credit Value: 1)
Textbook: Oklahoma Land of Contrasts
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 9,10,11,12

This course traces the history of Oklahoma from the prehistoric settlement of Native Americans through the twentieth century with special emphasis on geography and its impact, political and economic events prior to statehood, the development of constitutional government, and the political, social, and economic factors which influenced Oklahoma’s development. 

-U.S. Government
(1 semester – Credit Value: 1)
Textbook:MacGruder’s American Government
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Constitution and its philosophical and historical foundation. This course also examines the American political process.  Students will analyze how governments make public policy and develop skills for informed participation in public affairs.

-U.S. History
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: United States History: Reconstruction to the Present
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

This course traces the history of the United States from the Reconstruction Era through the domestic and foreign issues facing America today. Students will develop geographical, research, and writing skills through the study of America’s past. 

-World History
(2 Semester – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: World History: Patterns of Interaction
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 11, 12

This course is a study of civilization from prehistory to the present day. The student will understand the impact of geography on civilizations, identify the major political and economic systems of the world and examine the events, movements, ideologies, science, technology, and artistic culture which have shaped the development of major world civilizations. 

-Economics/ Personal Finance
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: Economics (Prentice Hall) and Foundations in Personal Finance (Dave Ramsey)
Prerequisite: None
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

This course is an introduction to the study of micro and macro economics with the primary emphasis on microeconomics or how individuals and firms make economic decisions.  In addition to learning practical applications of the American business system, the students learn the economic way of thinking and how to develop and better use their deductive reasoning which will assist them for the rest of their lives.  All Personal Finance modules required by the state are integrated into the course. The financial literacy component is provided through Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University for High School students. This curriculum is highly interactive and provides daily insight into personal finance issues in a format that is relevant to students.

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Religion Courses
(2 Semesters each year – Credit Value:  2 credits per year) 

-Religion I
Textbook: Behold Your God student manual by Positive Action for Christ, Inc.
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 9-10

As the source of all truth, God is in fact the highest truth we can study. Our view of him affects every other belief and practice. This Bible course will inspire students to explore the heights and depths of His majesty- because while God lies above and beyond our understanding, He has also chosen to make Himself known to us. In Hebrews 11:6, we read that we must except two things by faith: that God exists and that He rewards those who seek Him. From the starting point, we can begin to study the incomparable God described in scripture. Like a little child walking alongside a parent, we may not understand the height of God‘s holiness or the fullness of his grace, but we can feel the strength of His hand holding ours. The course is divided into six units, each of which has its own test: The Knowledge of God, The Nature of God, The Attributes of God, The History of Christ, The Person of Christ, and The Holy Spirit.

-Religion II
Textbook: Understanding the Faith and Understanding the Times
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Prerequisite: Completion of Religion I
Grade Level: 11-12

The first course in this series is an introduction to the core beliefs of Christianity and the most common objections to the faith. By the end of the course, students will have a solid grasp of the essentials of a Christian worldview and will be well equipped to respond to the most common objections to the faith.

The second course teaches the differences between Christianity and other prominent worldviews vying for allegiance in Western culture. The five other worldviews include Islam, postmodernism, secularism, Marxism, and new Spirituality. This curriculum effectively prepares young believers to defend a Christian worldview against other belief systems.  

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Foreign Language

-Spanish I – 2 consecutive years required
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: tba
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level:  9 – 11

Students in Spanish 1 are introduced to a variety of basic Spanish and Latin American vocabulary, grammar, and culture. An emphasis is placed on acquiring the four basic language skills: listening comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing.

-Spanish II – 2 consecutive years required
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Textbook: tba
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level:  10 – 12

Spanish 2 reviews and builds on the grammatical structures of Spanish 1. As with the previous course, the emphasis is on communication and the four basic language skills. Knowledge of the culture of Spanish speaking countries is expanded. 

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Performing/Fine Arts Electives – One year needed for graduation

-Art I – IV
(1 Semester or 2 Semesters – Credit Value: 1 or 2)
Prerequisite: none
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

This class is designed to give students an overview of art history beginning with the renaissance period and moving through the pop art period.   Students study various artists, learning about the historical time as well as the artist’s unique artistic style. Students will use assorted art mediums in order to recreate artwork with their own individual style.

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Communication

-Yearbook
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Prerequisite:  Need approval by the Yearbook advisor to be enrolled in this course.
Recommended: Strong keyboarding skills, ability to attend class before school
Grade Level: 7 – 12
Students learn to use a web based software program for the development of the yearbook. 

-Newspaper
(2 Semesters – Credit Value: 2)
Prerequisite:  Need approval by the Newspaper advisor to be enrolled in this course.
Recommended: Must be able to work before and or after regular school hours
Grade Level: 9 – 12

Students learn to use web based software programs for the development of the  school’s online newspaper. The course covers both the basics and ethics of journalism and requires the creativity of photography and graphic design to be implemented into publications. Video broadcast production options are also available. 

Please note: The use of academy computing resources is a privilege, not a right.  Violation of academy policies and procedures may result in cancellation of computer-use privilege and/or other disciplinary action. In addition, any user who willfully or through gross negligence destroys or damages any academy computing resources may be held financially responsible.  Computer vandalism will result in immediate cancellation of computer privileges and/or other disciplinary action. All students and parents of students enrolled in a district computer course will be required to read, review and sign the computer usage contract prior to use of district computing resources.

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Additional Curriculum

-Leadership  (no credit but class is included on student transcript)
Grade Level:  9, 10, 11, 12

Through the examination and application of leadership theory and methods, students will learn the skills necessary to be successful in leadership roles.  Topics explored are goal-setting, project planning, time-management, communication skills, problem-solving, group dynamics, and leadership styles. Through the use of hands-on learning activities, service projects, and fundraising, students will develop an awareness and appreciation for the role and responsibilities of effective leadership in our society.  This class meets approximately once each month.

-Strength and Conditioning
Grade Level:  9, 10, 11, 12